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Friday, January 18, 2019

James Hatfield - G.A.R., Bishop Post



James Hatfield led a somewhat sad life after his return from the war.  According to the 1890 Veterans Census of Defiance County, James served in Company M, 111th Indiana, enlisting on November 19, 1861.  He was discharged on October 4, 1864, having served 2 years, 11 months, and 15 days.

He appeared in the Indiana Civil War Index as enlisting in Goshen, Indiana, at the age of 18.  That listing put him in Company M, 2nd Cavalry, 41st Regiment.  James Hatfield does appear on that roster, mustering out as a Corporal.  Hatfield's unit was involved in some of bloodiest, hardest fighting of the war, including Shiloh, Chickamauga and the Siege of Atlanta.



At some point, he settled in Defiance, Ohio, after the war.  In the 1880 census, he lived on High Street with his wife, Kate, who was born in Ireland.  In 1880, he labored as a drayer*, but prior to that he worked on a machine at the Turnbull Wagon Company.  Perhaps the following incident at the company caused James to seek other employment: 

Defiance County Express, February 28, 1879

 Beginning about 1894, James Hatfield's health, both mental and physical, began to decline.

September 6, 1894: "James Hatfield had a stroke of paralysis.  This is his third attack and quite serious."  (Defiance Evening News)

September 20, 1894: James Hatfield, who has been dangerously ill, is able to be on the streets again."  (Defiance Republican Express)

December 20, 1894:
"TAKEN TO TOLEDO
James Hatfield of East Defiance Placed in the Asylum Today.

James Hatfield, of East Defiance, was adjudged insane by Judge Hay some days ago.  Mr. Hatfield suffered a severe spell of sickness early in the fall, from which he has never fully recovered.  For some time, his friends have noticed that his mind was unsettled and were fearful that he might do some deed of violence.  It is hoped and believed that after he receives treatment at the asylum, he will finally recover his health.

Mr. Hatfield is aged about 50 years, and is an honored member of Bishop post, G. A. R.  Monday, officer Dave Ross went to Mr. Hatfield's home and told him that they wanted to take him to some medical institute where he would receive treatment.  He agreed, and Tuesday morning Sheriff Rath took him to Toledo."
 (Defiance Republican Express - December 30, 1894)

January 10, 1895: "Mrs. Hatfield has been appointed guardian of her husband, James Hatfield."  (Defiance Democrat, January 10, 1895)

No evidence was found to indicate that James ever made it home again.  The Defiance Democrat reported on November 25, 1897:

"DIED AT ASYLUM.  Judge Hockman has received notice from the Toledo Asylum that James Hatfield, a Defiance County inmate, died there November 17." 

The burial place of James Hatfield remains unknown.  It was noted that Mrs. Hatfield received relief from the township during her latter years, from $3 - $5 a month. 




*Drayer -
What is a drayer? A drayer is one who pulls a cart, known as a dray. This cart is low, sturdy, without sides, and is used to carry heavy loads. Originally, the the cart had no wheels, and was rather like a sledge or sled. This sled would have to be "dragged" or "drayed" along the ground, either by horse or by the drayer himself. The drayer could have carried any load, and can be viewed as the equivalent of the modern day supply delivery man. A popular occupation for a "Drayer" was to bring beer and spirits to the local bars/pubs. 
 http://www.answers.com/Q/What_is_a_drayer

 
(This is part of a series on Civil War veterans of Defiance County who were part of the G.A.R., Bishop Post, that headquartered in the city.  Formed in 1879, the post was named after a local man, Captain William Bishop, Company D, 100th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Army who died as a result of wounds received in battle.  The veterans' photos are part of a composite photo of members that has survived.  If you have other information or corrections to add to the soldiers' stories, please add to the comments!)



Wednesday, January 9, 2019

The Look of the B & O, 1905

For many years, Lloyd V. Tuttle contributed historic photos and information to the Defiance Crescent-News for his column, "A Backward Glance."

On Tuesday, May 14, 1963, Mr. Tuttle discussed the B & O railroad as it once looked before the track was lifted and the viaduct formed on South Clinton Street.


Mr. Tuttle wrote:
"Here is a picture which will stump many old timers.  It was contributed by Stuart Duerk, 96 Grove Street.

The man in the photograph, taken in 1905, is Garrett Curns.  At the time the picture was snapped, the Baltimore & Ohio, was a single track railroad through Defiance.  It depicts the site of the present Clinton Street viaduct at the B & O passenger depot.

Before the B & O elevated its tracks through Defiance, there were watchmen at Deatrick and South Clinton Sts., and Jefferson and Ottawa Aves.  Each watchman had a little shanty, and took great pride in keeping the adjacent area neat by growing flowers and even shrubbery.

Mr. Curn's pride and joy were the morning glories, shown here climbing over one side of the shanty.

There was quite a big natural hump in the ground where Clinton Street passed over the track at this time.  Later, workmen transformed the hump into the present South Clinton Street viaduct.

Back of the shanty is now Bell Place, a little subdivision.  The photograph also depicts the bridge which once passed over the defunct Miami-Erie Canal."

Sunday, January 6, 2019

George A. Woods - Bishop Post, G.A.R.


George Albert Woods, the oldest child of David Woods and Leah Eckels, was born in Pennsylvania in 1843, but moved to Ohio at a very young age.  He was the only child of the couple to be born in Pennsylvania, as the other siblings were all born in Ohio, according to censuses.

By the 1850 census, the family were settled in Xenia, Greene County, Ohio, where David, 31, and Leah, 30, farmed and raised their three children at the time: George, W.B. (William), 4, and Charles, 2.

A move north prior to meeting the 1860 census enumerator found them in Pulaski in Williams County.  David had real estate worth $500 on which to raise his growing family which now included David, John, Mary, James and Anna.  George was sixteen years old and his occupation was given as farmhand.

Participation in the Union cause called to him when he was nineteen, as he enlisted on August 21, 1862, as a private in Company E, 111th O.V.I. The unit was organized in Toledo with a three year signup.  These soldiers fought through Kentucky and Tennessee and then into the large battles in Georgia.  Almost as soon as enlisting, George was promoted to full colonel on August 26, 1862, and later on to full sergeant.  He stayed throughout the war, being discharged in 1865, after serving two years, ten months and five days, according to the 1890 Veterans Census.  On that document, he reported his disability as "rhumatism (rheumatism) contracted in the U.S. Army."


According to Paulding County Marriage Records, George married Cynthia Jane Daniel in March of 1867.  By 1870, they were settled in Highland Township, Defiance County.  George was ready to farm with real estate worth $1000.  Their first child, Anna, was one year old.

In the 1880 census, George, 36, reported that he was a saw miller, while Cynthia stayed home with Anna, 11; Charles, 9; John, 7; Curtis, 5; Laura, 3; and Nora 2 months.  With them lived the teamster, Joseph Calkins, 20.
Now they lived in Richland Township.

George was a mover, as in the 1890 Veterans Census, he reported his residence as Sherwood, O.  By 1900, he and his family were in Farmer where George, 55, owned a farm, free and clear.  Their daughter, Jennie L. Nisley, 23, a widow, with one child, Roy L. Nisley, 3, lived with them at the time.  

The Defiance Express reported on April 6, 1905, that "George A Woods, who recently disposed of his farmer near Ney, has removed to this city and is now a resident of North Defiance."  Perhaps it was his retirement home.  He was active in the G.A.R. and elected President of the 111th, Company E reunion.

His wife died on March 21, 1917.




George A. Woods died on May 11, 1918, at the age of 74.  Several obituaries appeared in the newspapers, one in the Defiance Democrat and another in the Crescent News.


Defiance Democrat




 
(This is part of a series on Civil War veterans of Defiance County who were part of the G.A.R., Bishop Post, that headquartered in the city.  Formed in 1879, the post was named after a local man, Captain William Bishop, Company D, 100th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Army who died as a result of wounds received in battle.  The veterans' photos are part of a composite photo of members that has survived.  If you have other information or corrections to add to the soldiers' stories, please add to the comments!)

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

The Flag Pole in the Intersection




The Clyde Norway store was on the left.  Hal Spires climbed the flag pole.

Do you recognize the intersection of State Route 249 and the Farmer-Mark Road/ Route 2 which is the center of the village of Farmer?  Once upon a time, a flag pole was smack dab in the middle of the crossing. Why?  No one seems to know.

Not much information could be found on this situation, even from a couple of ladies who grew up in or lived near Farmer for over ninety years. They only knew that the pole was gone in the late 1920s or 1930.