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Friday, October 30, 2015

Judy, Judy, Judy...A Fatal Swing

From the Defiance Democrat - August 23, 1894

"THE BLOW FATAL.

Coroner Westrick Files His Verdict in the Jones Case.

JUDY JEFFERS INCRIMINATED

Doctors Babbitt and Lehman Report That Jones' Brain Was Discolored and Injured - The Grand Jury Comes Next.

Coroner Westrick filed his finding in the inquest upon the body of Frank Jones in the county clerk's office Saturday.  It is a voluminous document but leaves no doubt as to the guilt of Judy Jeffers.

Several witnesses were examined by the coroner, and the testimony shows that Jones was an unoffending party in the whole transaction.  The fight occurred on the night of Dec. 25, in front of a saloon in Sherwood.  Frank, or 'Buzzard' Miller came out of the saloon and struck Jones, who was standing quietly on the sidewalk talking to a friend.  Jones was sober and had not spoken to Miller.

Sherwood 1881

 The blow from Buzzard's fist staggered Jones for a minute and then he struck Miller.  They clinched and went down, Jones on top.  Miller was getting the worst of it and had cried enough when Judy Jeffers came up and with an elm club five feet long and an inch and a half by two and a quarter in thickness, struck Jones a left-handed blow just above the right ear, holding the club in both hands.  The blow stunned Jones.  Jones was 32 years old and lived at Sherwood, and was always of a quiet, unoffending disposition.

Dr. P. M. Lehman testifed that he was called to attend to Jones Jan. 1, 1894, and continued to render professional services until Feb. 1st.  There was a cut across the bridge of Jones' nose, and a finger was injured, but there was no wound or contusion, invisible, on the head.  Jones frequently complained of pain in the right side of his head.

Jones was a healthy, strong man and weighted 175 - 180 pounds previous to his injury.  At the sixteenth day after receiving the blow, he was not able to set up, being confined to his bed.  From then until his death, he constantly grew weaker and complained often of the pain in his head.

Dr. P. M. Lehman and Dr. D. S. Babbitt certified that they had performed an autopsy on the body of Jones on the 10th inst., and had found a portion of the right hemisphere of the cerebrum to be of a purple blue and showing after signs of injury.  A quantity of serum had escaped into the cranial cavity.

After hearing the testimony, Coroner Westrick found that Frank Jones came to his death from the effects of a terrible blow from a club in the hands of Judy Jeffers."

Although most of the time, Judy is a feminine name, in this case, it is a male.  

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

The Soldiers Relief Commission

Communities have been taking care of the poor, because of laws or through churches or just through the kindness of neighbors, for centuries.  After the Civil War and the deaths of thousands of men, a law was passed to help those widows and children who were left to fend for themselves.  The law evolved over time, but, in general, each county in Ohio had a Soldiers' Relief Commission, consisting of three persons who were appointed by the probate judge.  
 At first, those committee members had to have some connection with the military, such as a veteran or, for women, membership in an auxiliary. Eventually, the law was broadened to included "reputable citizens" and the people they helped could be anyone who really needed assistance. 

The three members of the commission would, in turn, appoint three members in each township or county seat to create a list of probable names of indigent persons.  These persons would have to apply for aid, providing financial information of income, loans, taxes, and other pertinent facts for the consideration of the committee.  Eventually, a list was made and submitted to the township clerk and eventually to the county commissioners for their approval. Payment was made from the county funds.  In case of urgent need, the clerk also had the power to provide for any indigent or neglected persons.  This committee was also delegated the task of providing burial places and stones for indigent soldiers.

On December 2, 1897, the list of persons who were to receive aid appeared in the Defiance Democrat.  Today, this might have been embarrassing, but then again, for the times, maybe it was not at all.

"SOLDIERS' RELIEF

Allowances From the County Fund Made to Those in Need 

The allowances by the Defiance County Soldiers' Relief commission for the coming five months to May 1st, made last Monday are as follows:

Defiance Township
Mrs. Mary A. Davis, per month..............................................................................$5.00
Mrs. Jeffers............................................................................................................  5.00
Mrs. L. A. Malson...................................................................................................  5.00
Mrs. Jane Hatfield..................................................................................................  5.00
Mrs. Francis Schneider..........................................................................................  5.00
Mrs. M. C. Stout.....................................................................................................  5.00
Mrs. Lena Manders................................................................................................  5.00
Mrs. Benj. Schupp..................................................................................................  5.00
Mrs. M. Marcelius...................................................................................................  4.00
Mrs. M. E. Hutchins................................................................................................  4.00
Mrs. Geo. Watts......................................................................................................  3.00
Mrs. Robt. Kyle.......................................................................................................  3.00
Mrs. John E. Richardson........................................................................................  3.00
Mrs. Alanom Grant.................................................................................................  3.00

Hicksville Township
Mrs. Laura Lawson.................................................................................................  $5.00
Mrs. Elizabeth Schooley.........................................................................................   5.00
Mrs. L. G. Cox.........................................................................................................  4.00
Mrs. Emma Attleberger............................................................................................  3.00
Mrs. Edward Brooks................................................................................................  3.00
Mrs. Cornelia Hindle................................................................................................  3.00

Highland Township
Mrs. H. D. Parker...................................................................................................... $5.00
Mrs. Augusta Warren................................................................................................  5.00

Noble Township
Mrs. Catheran Heiss.................................................................................................$4.00
 

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Lipp School, Defiance County, Ohio - 1893 - 1894

This list was abstracted from a souvenir booklet from Lipp School, possibly located in Delaware Township.  The information was provided by member, R. Bayes, whose grandparents lived in the area, and her father Roy "Bayse" attended this school.

LIPP SCHOOL

Winter 1893 - 1894

Meg A. Kleinhenn, Teacher
Henry Lipp, Director

Boys
Roy Bayse
Fred Slough
Henry Fair
Forest Peoples
John Stitsel
John Lipp
George Stitsel
Edgar Flickinger
Wilber Davis
Chester Flickinger
Chauncy Kleinhen
Tom Grogg
John Peoples
Chauncy Grogg
Roy Lang
Allen Pontions
Clearance Pontions
Walter Davis
Willie Koch  


Girls
Kate Grogg
Eda Koch
Bertha Slough
Minnie Grogg
Clara Koch
Kate Slough
Iva Peoples
Anna Lipp
Alice Stitsel
Emma Lipp
Nellie Koch
Viola Fair
Nina Fair
Daisy Boterf
Rebecca Fair
Alta Davis

Sunday, October 25, 2015

The "Dirty Shirts" of Farmer High School - 1946

The Farmer High School Boys Basketball team of 1946 made local history, at least, when they won the Class B State Championship that year.  In their four years together, this team of 33 boys won 100 games and lost 4.  Known affectionately as the "Dirty Shirts," but really the Farmer Tigers, they gave Defiance County reason to crow about their accomplishments.
On the 40th anniversary of the win, the Bryan Times ran a recap of that championship game.

From The Bryan Times -  June 5, 1986

"...The state tourney was played in Springfield that year as St. John Arena in Columbus was still in the future.  
On Friday, the Tigers tamed Bradford by a score of 57 - 29 and could have probably reached 65 points had not coach Ollie Zedaker brought in subs off the bench in the second half.  The Bradford team had defeated the 1945 champs, Northridge, the week before and the southwestern Railroaders were heavily favored, but the Tigers were not awed as they drove Bradford batty with a devastating fast break.  

Farmer jumped to a 10 point lead at the start of the game and were never headed after that.  Bradford had won 26 of the 28 games they had played as they had held their foes to an average of 28 points per game before they met their match with the Tigers.  Leighton Fritz paced Farmer with 19 points.

Then the Tigers met Worthington on Saturday for the championship and proved a good little team can beat a bigger team as they scored a 36 - 32 victory.  The game was close as Worthington led five times and Farmer nine times.  Farmer led 10-8 after one period, but trailed 17-14 with 10 seconds to play in the half.  However, the Tigers scored four points in those 10 seconds to lead 18-17 at the half.  

The game was nip and tuck in the third period with Farmer leading 30-26 as the final stanza opened.  They refused to give up the lead and became the champions of the 580 Class B teams in the state.

Fritz was not as hot in his shooting as in the win over Bradford, but was able to make some fine passes to Ed Lord who tallied 17 of the 36 points.  

After the game the Farmer team was presented the trophy with each player getting a gold basketball.  Fritz, Lord and Bob Beerbower were named to the AP all tourney team.  

Farmer closed the school on Friday and three busloads of students and scores of fans in autos made the pilgrimage to Wittenberg College for the state meet.  The school reopened on Monday for all but the players.  On Sunday afternoon, the team was welcomed back to Farmer as they were met two miles from town by the fire department and taken to the auditorium for their welcome back.  Most of the people were sleepy after driving most of the night to get back from Springfield to do their chores, but sleep was the furthest thing from the minds of most of the fans who welcomed home the conquering heroes..."

Other factoids from the article...

Farmer was the first Northwestern Ohio team to win the state title. 

In 1926, Ney H. S., coached by Edgar Bergman, went to the state semi-finals.

Mark Center H.S. was runner up to the Waterloo Wonders in 1934. 

The only loss Farmer had in 1946 was to Edgerton and they later defeated them in a rematch, 61-23.

Leighton Fritz scored 1533 points in four years, which was  the all-time Defiance County record.

Farmer High School no longer exists, but Worthington has grown considerably. 

Friday, October 23, 2015

Bigelow School, Farmer Township - 1921 - 1924

The Bigelow School was located in Farmer Township, 2 miles north and 2 miles west of Farmer in Section 5, at the corner of Scott and Ridenour Roads.  It was known as District #3.

 1921 - 1922


1922- 1923
Front Row - Francis Severence, Lavon Kimpel, Russell Heisler, Merl Ridenour

Second Row - Teacher, Lulu Loomis, Berniece Severence, Beatrice Vollmer, Ivan Kimpel, Roger Kimpel, Melvin Kimpel

Back Row - Trevor Mavis, Marguerite Ridenour, Martin Vollmer, Pauline Ridenour, Adrian Vollmer, Frances Heisler, Marjory Kimpel

 1924

Thursday, October 22, 2015

The Plans of the Five Old Maids

Following in the footsteps of the liberated women of their day, a group of Defiance girls decided that they would never marry.  Their plan for their future was interesting, and now I wonder if they kept to their pact...

"ANTI-MARRIAGE AGREEMENT

Novel Compact Entered Into By Five Defiance Maidens.

 This agreement made and entered into this 18th day of August A.D. 1894, by and between Annette Slough, Eva Blair, Albene Daoust, Hattie Blair and Mollie Kiser, all residents of Defiance County, of Defiance, and the state of Ohio, and all being of lawful age and in sound mind, witnesseth:

That said parties, realizing the cares and responsibilities of married women, and that men of today have degenerated into mere popinjays (a vain or conceited person, pretentious and prone to idle chatter), and further realizing that our chances are mighty slim, have colluded together as follows:

That in consideration of the promises and agreements hereinafter provided, the said Slough, Blair, Daoust, Blair and Kisor, mutually agree between themselves that they will not, neither will any of them, marry any man, boy or widower, that they will forever , as long as the breath of life exists within them, eschew society of all men, whether single or married, that they will not, neither will any one of them, become engaged to any man, widow or bachelor, that they and each and all of them, promise and agree among themselves and with each other, to live and die in single blessedness. 

The contract then proceeds to say that in the year 1900, they will buy the Blout property, now occupied by O. D. Loveridge, or if not this property, some other suitable place, build an 'Old Maid's Hall,' and live together in peace and harmony.

It is further agreed that if said parties or any of them shall fail or neglect to comply with the terms of this agreement, and do marry any male, whether situated in this county or state aforesaid, or any place on this mundane sphere, that said party or parties breaking this contract, shall pay to said remaining party or parties the sum of 25 dollars, to be used by said remaining parties for mourning and habillments (clothing) of woe, and that if said parties all marry, the one last breaking the agreement shall, with the $25 penalty, buy and erect a tombstone dedicated to the buried hopes of 'Five Old Maids.' 

We do hereby jointly and severally in the name of Susan B. Anthony, Belva Lockwood, Mrs. Lease, Frances Willard and Lady Somerset, bind ourselves to this agreement.

Witness our hands the day and year aforesaid.  
Signed, Mollie Kiser, Hattie Blair, Nettie Slough, Eva M. Blair, Berna Daoust. 
In Duplicate. "

Defiance Democrat - October 12, 1898 

So, did they all never marry?  Perhaps a reader will know something about that.  And what property did they have an eye on for their Old Maid's Hall?  Oh, how I would love to know how it all played out.

Monday, October 19, 2015

Sons of Veterans in Defiance Report for the Spanish-American War


The Sons of Veterans were an auxillary group to the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR).  Organized thirteen years after the Civil War, in 1878, the men in the group were all sons of the veterans of that war.

When the Spanish-American War broke out, the Sons of Veterans were called upon to fight.
In February 1898, the battleship, U.S.S. Maine, was shattered by an explosion in Havana, Cuba. Prior to this tensions had been high, but this incident was the tipping point that brought about the war between Spain and its colonies and the United States.  The "Dons" was a nickname for the Spaniards, based on the fictional character, Don Quioxte.

This call to arms appeared in the Defiance Democrat on May 19, 1898.



"This has given soldiers in Defiance a great impetus and seven Sons of Veterans have joined the ranks this morning.  The roster, up to date, is as follows.  Several more new men were mustered in this afternoon:

Capt. James F. Crandall

1st Lieut. - H. B. Lewis
2nd Lieut. - Wesley E. King
1st Sergeant - Harry C. Haynes
2d Sergeant - H. C. Schmick
3d Sergeant - Syl Garver
4th Sergeant - Frank B. Gorman
5th Sergeant - J. C. Tuttle

Private
J. H. Neaderhauser
M. W. Partee
Edward Colwell
Henry Robbins
Lem Sapp

Maurice Britton
James Spurgeon
J. Prosser
N. E. Andrews
W. O. Ash

W. D. Beardsley
Gale E. Hale 
L. E. Beardsley, Jr.
Frank H. Zoller
Charles E. Ayers

Clyde Davis
Wm. Robinson
Peter Both
Ed. Bell
Jacob Hay

Coe G. Robison
J. C. Osborn
Miley Koup
C. C. Shaner
Simon Naveau

Wm. Hollenbaugh
George W. Schamberger
R. Winshall
J. P. Thalman
Lewis E. Rife

Wm. H. Widmer
James O. Richardson
Gilson D. Light
Charles Boyer
Merry Lewis

E. E. Sanderson
Merle G. Richardson
R. C. Hall
Arthur J. Barr
Martin Young

Willis Newell
Charles Speaker
Albert Houtz
John Burk
Ben Pittenger

R. R. Weaver
Fred G. Root
David F. Kuhn
Ed. Kuhn
Otto J. Noe

Earl Weisenberger
George Lee
H. A. Spangler
J. T. Bermingham

Published on May 26th, 1898  were the physicians' lists of men who took the physical examination for military service in the Defiance military company.

"By Dr. Thacker:
George Lee - Irvin C. Hatfield - J. Fred Patten - Milo S. Koup - Albert R. Dills - Henry Clay Lewis - Harry C. Haynes -  B. E. Abell  - Leroy E. Beardsley Jr. - William O. Asche -  Albert V. Sieren - John Henry Neaderhauser -  Fred Arthur Mills  - William D. Beardsley  - George Clarence Houck  - Henry E. Minsel  -  Charles Bowen -  Lloyd Arlo Harrell  -  Arthur J. Barr  - Delos Benton Harrell

By Dr. Westrick:
H. F. Bartels  -  William H. Widmer -  Merrill Richardson  -  John Dunlapp  -  Martin Young  -   Edward Kuhn  -  Herman A. Spangler  -  C. Krabach  - Orlo J. Noe  -  Maurice S. Britton  -  W. A. Newell  - Earl Weisenberger  -  Lewis V. Carpenter  -  Volney A. Palmer  -  John P. Gleason  -  John Scott  -  Syl Garver  -  Robert Weaver  -  Edward A. Schultz  -  James F. Crandall

By Dr. Reynolds:
M. W. Partee  -  Jamed Ellsworth  -  Webb W. Wood  -  Theodore Keffer  - Frank M. McKellips  -  Frank H. Gorman  -  J. C. Tuttle  -  Fred N. Mink  -  C. H. Schmick  -  Wilson Motter  -  B. F. Pittenger  - David Phisps  -  Lem Sapp  -  Fred G. Root  - Peter Switzer  -  Harry B. Lewis  -  Wesley E. King  -  Peter Both 

By Dr. Stevens:
Alf Rollins -  Thomas W. Cleary  - William E. Houck  -  William Franklin Schooley  -  Fred H. Zeller  -  Jasper LeRoy Williamson  -  John E. Rowan  -  Brice Hilton Jr.  -  Edward E. Bell  - Joseph Peter Thalman  -  Clyde E. Davis  -  Franklyn M. Clark  -  William Conners  -  Joseph Wolf  -  Jay DeHaven  -  John Mansfield  -  William Henry Hollenbaugh." 
 

Saturday, October 17, 2015

Arrests Made for the Murder of Enos Rath


THREE MEN ARRESTED

On the Charge of Murdering Enos Rath of Hicksville.

THEY ARE ANTWERP TOUGHS.

Sheriff Eiser Went After Them and Brought Them to Defiance and Jailed Them.


Three men charged with the crime of killing Enos Rath, Hicksville's night watchman, are under arrest and in jail at this place.  They were arrested at Antwerp Saturday night by Sheriff John P. Eiser, who is confident he has the guilty parties.
The facts leading up the arrest were as follows:
Saturday afternoon about 2 o'clock the blood hounds of S. S. Shissler, of Oakwood, arrived at Hicksville and were placed on the trail of the man who committed the murder.  The dogs trailed off across High street to the westward, then veered south to the vicinity of the school house where they stopped, apparently at the end of the trail.

Inquiry of a woman residing near where the dogs stopped developed that a rig had been tied there during the night and was driven away about 1 o'clock or thereabouts, going south towards Antwerp.  It was then brought to mind that Ed. Johnson and Frank Zuber, of Antwerp, had been in Hicksville just a week previous and had made themselves obnoxious and troublesome by carousing around publicly with a couple of lewd women.  At that time, Enos Rath had pursued them and had them cornered for the purpose of arresting them, but finally decided to allow them to leave town which they promptly did, but before going, threatened to come back and 'do' the officer to get even.

Sheriff Eiser telephoned to Antwerp and learned that Zuber and Johnson, accompanied by Floyd Rumbow of that place, had been out Friday night with a livery rig.

Whereupon Eiser, accompanied by Prosecuting Attorney Ansberry, Marshal James Sensenbach, of Hicksville,and S. S. Shissler, the Oakwood blood hound owner, drove to Antwerp.  There, upon some investigation, the Sheriff arrested the three men.  As the officers did not leave Hicksville until about 8 p.m., it was bed time when they reached Antwerp and got ready to make the arrests.  They found Johnson and Rumbow at their homes in bed and Zuber sleeping in the hay mow of his grandfather's barn.  Zuber made his home with his grandfather."

The men were questioned intensely, but couldn't keep their stories straight. First, they claimed to be at a house of 'unsavory character' four miles east of Antwerp, then they changed their location to Payne.  But investigators found neither to be true, so they were brought back to the scene of the crime in Hicksville where a neighbor lady identified Zuber by his ulster - a man's heavy double-breasted overcoat with a belt or half-belt at the back.  She wasn't sure of the other two.
Unfortunately, the men didn't keep their mouths shut about the crime and they had bragged to some people that they did someone in on Friday night.

"Sheriff Eiser brought his prisoners down from Hicksville to Defiance on a freight train, arriving here Sunday morning about 8 o'clock.  He was 'laid out' at Delaware Bend two or three hours by the engine of the train giving out some way. On his arrival here, he placed Runbow in the city prison and the other two were placed in the county jail...


All three of the men under arrest are single.  Ed. Johnson is aged 25, Frank Zuber, 24, and Floyd Rumbow, 23.  Johnson has served a term in the Ohio penitentiary for the crime of rape.  He was sentenced by Judge Snook in Paulding a few years ago.  Zuber bears a bad reputation as being a reckless, worthless character.  Rumbow is the best of the three, not having been mixed up in much deviltry, though not much has been said in favor of him."
  
The coroner found the cause of death was the crushing blows to the skull which broke it in several places.  His left wrist and bones in his left hand were broken as he had drawn his gun, but dropped it and the thugs answered by beating on his wrist.  It was thought that if justice were left to the citizens of Hicksville, a lynching might have occurred. 
   
(Defiance Democrat - November 30, 1899)

  

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Enos Rath Murdered in HIcksville!

"FOUL MURDER

 Enos Rath, Hicksville's Night Watchman,

Clubbed to Death.

 

HELD UP IN THE DARKNESS

By a Gang of Three Toughs Bent Upon Revenge for Their Victim Having Watched Them.



Enos Rath is murdered!
Such was the startling, sensational information that greeted the people of Defiance upon their first appearance on the streets Saturday morning.

Hicksville's well known, faithful and efficient night watchman and Deputy Marshal had been set upon during the night by some desperate persons while performing his official duty and his life pounded away.

The story of the affair, as obtained by the Hicksville representative of this paper, is as follows:

About 1 o'clock a.m., Wm. Bricker who resides on High street, the principal business street, about twenty five rods south of the B & O depot, was awakened by the noise of men scuffling on the walk in front of his place and the cry of a man apparently in an agony of pain.

Mr. Bricker ran out of a side door of his house in his night clothes to see what was the trouble,and in coming into view, observed in the darkness three men and Night Watchman Enos Rath, the latter being assailed and beaten by the others.  Feeling that it was necessary for him to be dressed before getting to Rath's assistance, he hurried back into the house to get some of his clothes on, ad on entering the house, he accidentally stumbled over a chair, which made considerable noise.  About that time, Rath's assailants fled, it being supposed that the noise gave them the warning that assistance was coming to him.

Before Mr. Bricker had got fairly dressed, Rath managed to drag himself, or stagger, upon Bricker's porch, and on Bricker opening the front door, the officer entered.  In answer to Bricker's questions, he responded that he had had trouble.  Rath was bleeding freely from frightful blows which he had sustained about the head.  His head was a mass of bruises and cuts.

His story of the affray, as he told it in a labored manner, due to his injuries, was that he had met three men in front of Bricker's place.  In the darkness, he took them for men seeking a place to stay and thought they probably wanted to get in the village prison where tramps are allowed to spend the night.  But, no sooner did he address them than two of them leveled revolvers at him while a third dealt him a terrible blow on the head with a club or some other blunt instrument.  And this was followed up by several more blows on his head, which fell thick and fast, until his assailants took the alarm and left him.

Mr. Bricker called Charles Wires, a neighbor, to assist him, and together they started to take Mr. Rath home. They walked as far as the Swilley House, when Mr. Rath said he was too sick to go farther, and they took him in the hotel office and sat him down in a chair and sent for a doctor.
Rath soon relapsed into unconsciousness and, before the doctor arrived, he sank into the arms of death, his injuries being beyond human endurance.  He died a few moments after 2 o'clock.
Later his remains were given in charge of an undertaker and removed to his home.

Details of the crime were telegraphed and telephoned to surrounding towns, and an order was sent to Oakwood for blood hounds with which to trail the murderers.
Boot tracks in the soft earth about the scene of the murder were the only clue left for the officers to work on.  These were guarded during the forenoon hours so as to prevent their obliteration, in order that the bloodhounds might be given the scent.
The people of this entire county are very much wrought up over the terrible deed, as Mr. Rath's acquaintance was wide and his friends among the law abiding people are universal.


Enos Rath was an exceptionally good police officer.  In the performance of his duty, he never faltered or wavered, no matter how great the danger to himself.  It was his devotion to duty and fearlessness that probably inspired his treacherous murder.
He served as policeman in Defiance for three years and has been an officer in Hicksville since 1894, during all of which time he was regarded as an excellent officer."

(The incoming trains at the B & O depot were checked for suspicious characters, but none were found.  Some of Rath's relatives, including his father, William, and brothers, W. I. and George A. and his sister Mrs. Toberen took the 11 a.m. into Hicksville that morning to give assistance to the family.  Along with the relatives, others came from Defiance: Sheriff Eiser, Prosecuting Attorney Ansberry, Probate Judge Hockman, Marshal Hull and officers Daniel Shea and Seibert.)

"Mr. Rath leaves a wife and two children.  His son, Joseph, is married and resides in Hicksville, and a daughter, Ina, who is single, and resides with her mother.

Enos Rath was born April 17, 1852, at which time his parents resided on the farm now owned by David Rasor, in Tiffin township.  He remained at home working on the farm most of the time until January 1877, when he married Miss Elizabeth Wilson.  He then moved to St. Johns, Mich. where he was employed sme years in a wood working factory.  
He then moved back to Tiffin township where he was occupied for a time doing county ditch work on contracts.  About thirteen years ago, he moved to the city of Defiance and for some time worked in the furniture factory of Geiger & Son, and the bucket factory of Burgland and Shead.  Finally he was appointed on the city police force where he served about three years, having charge of the Third Ward.
In 1894 he was engaged by Hicksville people to come to that village and break up a gang of thieves who were making headquarters there and causing a good deal of trouble.  His work was so effectual and satisfactory, the merchants of the village offered him steady employment as night policeman, and he has been thus engaged since.

He is the oldest of a family of seven children.  His brothers are John H. assistant foreman of the box factory; George A., a painter who resides in this city; W. I., the ex-sheriff; and the youngest brother, James and sisters, Katie, wife of Joseph Fiddler and Dollie, wife of Henry Toberen.  His father, Wm. Rath, also resides in this city with his second wife."

Enos Rath died on November 25, 1899.
McCauley Cemetery.  More information here: Enos Rath on Findagrave


(Defiance Democrat - November 30, 1899)

To be continued... 

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Central Public School, District No. 5, Delaware Township, 1915

1915
CENTRAL PUBLIC SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 5

Delaware Twp., Defiance Co., O.

Blanche A. Stevens, Teacher
School Officers
John Luce
A. E. LaVergne
V. V. Miller
Ed. Kretzer
Thos. Fleagle
H. L. Traxler, Clerk





Pupils

7th Grade
Raymond Anderson
Freddie Breno
Ollie Michaels
Howard Moon
Florence Roland

6th Grade
Walter Haver
Alma Roland
Ralph Traxler
Laura Roland

5th Grade
Marie Keesberry
Ethel Michaels
 Anna Anderson

4th Grade
Nellie Luce
John Sanders
Cyril Roland
Grayse Smith
Robert Sanders
Elisha Traxler

3rd Grade
Aloysius Shininger
Dayle Crosser
Herbert Traxler
Estle Partee
Minphred Sanders
Alton Ferry
Gilbert Parent
Charlottie Michaels

2nd Grade
Wilma Parent
Guy Michaels
Edwin Partee
Oscar Condon

1st Grade
Richard Limbaugh
Wayne Crosser
Raymond Sanders
Walfred Ross
Georgie Ross
June Whetstone
Douglas Traxler
Paul Parent
Clarence Shininger
Darrel Kinsley

1915

Sunday, October 11, 2015

Adams Township - Maddock School, District # 2

The District #2 school was located in Section 4 of Adams Township at the intersection of Nagel Road and Harper Road.  Whether any of the pupils in the photo are the same as those mentioned in the souvenir booklets is unknown.  No year or identification was given on the photo.
This frame school was eventually replaced with a brick structure.






Friday, October 9, 2015

Defiance County Pioneers - Charlotte Bruner Tuttle

Charlotte Bruner Tuttle, mother of Andrew Tuttle, came to Defiance County when she was quite young and settled with her family in the Brunersburg area.  One of her sons, Andrew, was the benefactor of items which brought about the creation of the Tuttle Museum in downtown Defiance.

"DEATH OF MRS. TUTTLE

A Pioneer Lady of Defiance Passes to Her Reward.

Charlotte Tuttle, holding son, Andrew

Mrs. Charlotte Bruner Tuttle, wife of the late John Tuttle, died Thursday at 12:30, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mary Tuttle Beatty, wife of Chas. Beatty, on High street in North Defiance.  Early in September, Mrs. Tuttle went to spend the winter with her daughter, Mrs. Henry March, at Tiffin, and only a week ago on Wednesday, returned to Defiance to die, her trouble resulting in dropsy of the heart.

She survived her husband, John Tuttle, seven years.  Mrs. Charlotte Bruner was born in Maryland, in 1824, on Dec. 6th, and removed with her parents to Brunersburg, when but three years of age, and has lived her life and performed her duties as daughter, wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother in this immediate neighborhood. 

John Tuttle
 She was married to John Tuttle in 1844.  She was the mother of seven children as follows:
Andrew Tuttle,
Mrs. John Spangler (Elizabeth Tuttle),
Cornelius Tuttle,
Alvin Tuttle,
Mrs. Henry March (Laura Tuttle), Mrs. Chas. Beatty (Mary Tuttle),
and Elizabeth Tuttle.  

The eldest daughter died in infancy.

Mrs. Tuttle had twenty grand-children and one great grand-child.  She has been a consistent member of the Methodist church for the past twenty-five years, has not only raised her own family, but the two grand-children of her son, Alvin - Ed__ and Virl Tuttle.

She was always a hard-working woman, a typical American mother, and the impress of her earnest work will last forever.  The funeral services will be held from the residence of Charles Beatty on Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock and the interment will be in the Brunersburg cemetery.  All friends of the family are invited to be present."

Defiance Democrat - March 25, 1897 

 
Tuttle Monument, Brunersburg Cemetery. www.findagrave.com  

At Rest. Charlotte, His Wife, Died Mar. 19, 1897, Aged 74 yrs.

John Tuttle, Dec. 5, 1890, Aged 70 year

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Adams Township - District #1 School

This school was located at the intersection of Nagel Road and Walnut Grove Road in Section 12, Adams Township.

No identification on the photo nor is a year given.